NEWS

A new bond with nature is goal of UN’s Mother Earth Day celebration

Harmony with Nature – living a better quality of life while minimizing the use of toxic materials and preserving natural resources – was the focus of the International Mother Earth Day celebration Monday at the United Nations.

“Mother Earth is suffering – and it is our doing,” Miroslav Lajčák, President of the General Assembly, told the Eighth Interactive Dialogue on Harmony with Nature. Climate change, pollution and a loss of biodiversity “take a toll on human life and health,” he said. “But they affect, first and foremost, the Earth.”

The sustainable development that is sought by the world community relies upon the three overarching objectives of devising supportable patterns of consumption and production, protecting and managing natural resources and eradicating poverty.

Mr. Lajčák said that the 2018 theme of the annual Mother Earth Day, “Earth Jurisprudence in the implementation of sustainable production and consumption patterns in Harmony with Nature” was timely, since progress toward Sustainable Development Goal 12 – which calls for responsible production and consumption patterns globally – will be reviewed during a High-Level Political Forum in July.

Earth Jurisprudence is an emerging field of law that seeks to give greater consideration to nature, promoting sustainable production and consumption patterns.

Pointing to droughts and floods, poverty and excess, rising sea levels and dwindling fresh water, the General Assembly President, who is from Slovakia, stressed that humanity has not yet struck a harmonious balance.

“Our Earth is home to these extremes,” he said. “It will only get worse if we do not change the way we produce and consume goods – especially as our population grows.”

“And if our population grows as predicted, by 2050 we will need about three planets to sustain our current lifestyles. But we only have one,” stressed Mr. Lajčák. “And this is why we really need to take care of it. We have neither a Plan B nor a Planet B.”

“To achieve our Sustainable Development Goals, we have to change our bad habits,” he maintained, urging everyone to take action and redouble their efforts for Mother Earth.

“Living in harmony with nature is not just beneficial. It is necessary,” Mr. Lajčák concluded.

This article was originally published by news.un.org.

Recent news

A giant sequoia in California is still smoldering from last year's wildfires

Deep within California's Sequoia National Park, one of the state's iconic redwood trees is still… Read more

How the Zoom era has ruined conversation

When Rabbi Hannah Goldstein would talk to families before a funeral in pre-pandemic times, she… Read more

Wildfire smoke trends worsening for Western US

From the Pacific Northwest to the Rocky Mountains, summers in the West are marked by… Read more

Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air pollution isn't hard on the hearts of adults only, suggests a new analysis that… Read more

Breathing Other People's Smoke Can Raise Your Odds for Heart Failure

Exposure to secondhand smoke may up your odds for heart failure, a new study warns.… Read more

US woman found alive in forest after surviving on moss, grass for months

A "resourceful" US woman missing for more than five months has been found alive in… Read more

Demand for Amazon virtual sellers grew 778% in the last 6 months: Here are 4 more in-demand freelance services

Despite challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic, businesses have pivoted to meet changing demands and… Read more

Lightning and subvisible discharges produce molecules that clean the atmosphere

Lightning bolts break apart nitrogen and oxygen molecules in the atmosphere and create reactive chemicals… Read more

Was North America populated by 'stepping stone' migration across Bering Sea?

For thousands of years during the last ice age, generations of maritime migrants paddled skin… Read more

One of NYC’s – and the World’s – Top Restaurants to Go Totally Meat-Free

Eleven Madison Park is considered one of the finest restaurants in both New York City… Read more